Category Archives: TICs & Multi-Unit Bldgs

What You Can Buy: Two-Unit Buildings

Two-unit buildings in San Francisco that are eligible for one or two owner occupiers are one of the most desirable multi-unit property types in San Francisco. Two buyers interested in partnering up and living in both units while they pursue a fast-track condo conversion are great prospects for such a building, as is an owner occupier who wants to reside in one unit and rent out the other. (The latter doesn’t allow that owner to circumvent the condo lottery, but it can be an excellent way to afford a home that you otherwise may not have been able to purchase without factoring in rental income.) Continue Reading

TIC Owners Await Condo Conversion Legislation Outcome

I’ve been contacted recently by many TIC owners, inquiring about my thoughts on what the legislation will mean for resale value related to their individual situations—which can vary widely. Some have been in the condo lottery for many years, others have rented out their TIC interest, and others have recently purchased an interest in a three-unit building but haven’t even entered the lottery yet.

The condo conversion legislation was initially introduced last year by Supervisors Scott Wiener and Mark Farrell. In response, tenants’ rights supporters voiced their opinions, which has led to Supervisors David Chiu and Norman Yee recently proposing several amendments designed to help reach a compromise. Continue Reading

Yours Truly, Quoted on KQED About TIC Legislation

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors Land Use and Economic Development Committee was scheduled to vote today on legislation that will potentially allow some TIC homeowners to bypass the condo lottery and pay a one-time fee to complete their unit’s conversion. As is typical with any legislation that affects homeowners and tenants, the issue is controversial.

And the vote has been delayed by a month, as Supervisor Mark Farrell reportedly wants additional time to talk with tenants’ rights groups.

I am, of course, a homeownership advocate (and former renter). And there are two sides to every issue. But I’m thinking that there’s something to this TIC legislation that should be able to work. In a city where two-thirds of all residents are renters—and property taxes help subsidize many things here—the Board of Supervisors should take a balanced view of the condo conversion issue and update its position so we don’t have a bunch of homeowners languishing in the lottery.

Check out the story (with link to the original audio broadcast) here: “San Francisco Struggles With Decision That Could Help Some Homeowners—And Hurt Renters.”

Buyer Goes Bonkers Over Mission Dolores Units

Buyer Goes Bonkers Over Mission Dolores Units

Proving that Mission/Mission Dolores homeowners basically can’t miss in our market these days, the modest two-unit building at 3643-3645 19th Street (at Dolores) sold for what I would describe as a stunning price recently.

The main-level flat (living room, above) was vacant and unstaged. There were two bedrooms, an updated, eat-in kitchen with basic finishes, and a dining room. Downstairs was a very small, tenant-occupied studio with a sleeping alcove.

Listed at $1,225,000, the building sold to an all-cash buyer from the neighborhood for $1,510,000.

Unfortunately for a majority of buyers, it’s a challenge to compete with cash buyers who are not wildly concerned about the prices they’re paying. After all, when a loan isn’t involved, neither is an appraisal. My guess is that a formal appraisal would not have come in at value on this building, knowing the comps. But this isn’t the first instance of buyers paying too much for Mission Dolores properties; this sort of reckless real estate behavior has been happening since early 2012.

Buyers Turn to TICs in Tight Market

As condo prices climb and low inventory persists in centrally located neighborhoods, San Francisco buyers appear to be more willing to take on TICs.

A total of 66 TIC interests sold in the last quarter of 2011, at an average price of $594,127. However, buyers snapped up 94 TICs in Q4 2012, and the average price shot up by about 9% to $645,091.

In a city where the average condo price is almost $1M, TICs still represent a more affordable path to home ownership—particularly where 2BR units are concerned. Almost half of the TICs sold in the last quarter of 2012 were 2BRs, with 1BR TICs representing 32% of the total sold. The least popular TIC type was the 3BR+ unit; only 22% of buyers purchased those. Continue Reading

Cash Sales Soared in 2012

Cash Sales Soared in 2012

Cash buyers hit the San Francisco market with fervor throughout 2012, across all price ranges, property types and neighborhoods. Foreign buyers seemed to also be very active, wiring in large sums of cash from South America, China, and Europe.

If you’re aiming to buy or sell a property this year, I think it’s helpful to have a sense for where the cash buyers will potentially be circulating. Here’s my 2012 breakdown by the numbers for each home type: Continue Reading

State of the TIC Market: October 2012

A total of 144 TICs sold from June 1 – October 16th, 2012, with an average of 65 days on market and a median sales price of $602,000.

By comparison, more than 1100 condos sold in the same time period. Buyers obviously prefer condos, with the appeal being individual unit ownership and the availability of historically low, fixed-rate loans.

The most popular—and least risky types—of TIC sales are still occurring in two-unit buildings, as these properties have a much more direct path to condo conversion. After that, buyers appear to be open to TICs in three- to six-unit buildings offering fractional financing. (You can’t condo convert more than six units.) Continue Reading

House & Condo Prices Rise, TIC Market Picks Up

Yes, it’s true. Single-family home and condo sales are up 11% in the past six months, with days on market decreasing to 11.5% and 22%, respectively. Good news for those property owners who are thinking of putting their homes on the market in the Fall.

This week’s MarketTracker Report takes a look at these stats, as well as the slow and steady rise of the TIC market. We also highlight three cool TICs and turn the spotlight on NoPa so you can get a sense for what this North Panhandle neighborhood offers.

Plus, the most recent citywide sales and more! It’s all here in the Zephyr MarketTracker.

Offset Your Mortgage in a Multi-Unit Building

For buyers who are looking for a home in a centrally located neighborhood, an excellent option is to owner occupy a flat in a multi-unit building and rent out the other units. That’s how I was able to afford to purchase my own property in Noe Valley in 1998; renting out the lower flat afforded us the opportunity to own our home, as well as have a long-term income stream. I’ve had several clients purchase such properties this year, and the purchase price could often be workable when you have at least 20% down and factor in projected/existing rents. And the presently hot rental market is certainly making this housing option more appealing. Continue Reading

Are the TICs at 226 27th in Noe Valley for You?

Are the TICs at 226 27th in Noe Valley for You?

Whenever a gaggle of new units hits the Noe Valley market offering 2BRs in the $400,000-$500,000 range, I start receiving inquiring emails from various prospective home buyers. I explain to everyone that the units are tenancy-in-common (TIC) interests, and then am usually asked to explain how TICs are different from condos. From there, I’m either scheduling a showing or being told that TICs are not an option.

So I thought I’d cut to the chase and write a public service blog post that will help any buyers out there who are curious about the TICs at 226 27th Street in Noe Valley. I viewed four of the units this week on broker tour, and have also been watching the former apartment building being renovated over the past several months. Continue Reading

TIC Market Slower, But Still Strong

The tenancy-in-common (TIC) market in San Francisco may not be the busiest it’s ever been. After all, condo prices have fallen since the 2005-2008 market heights, and most buyers would prefer to own their own unit (vs an interest in a building, with fellow owners all on the same title).

But the TIC market is certainly not dead. A total of 120 TIC interests have sold year to date, at an average of $598,422. TICs are taking longer to sell than other property types, and those 120 TICs took an average of 80 days to sell. There are 90 TIC interests currently in contract, and 54 TICs on the market (including a newly renovated, seven-unit building on Dolores at 22nd Street). Continue Reading

Mission Dolores Units Sell for Way Over Asking

Mission Dolores Units Sell for Way Over Asking

I toured 3883-85 20th Street adjacent to Mission Dolores Park when it came on the market in August. The vacant property was listed at $1.3M was essentially a shell of a property, with plans to remodel and legalize it as a two-unit building. There was a large yard and an additional housekeeping unit in the back. Based on the condition, it was clear that a buyer who needed a loan to complete the purchase would have a bit of a challenge. The rear of the house sat just above the J Muni track. Continue Reading

Just Listed: Classic Russian Hill TIC

Just Listed: Classic Russian Hill TIC

My new listing at 1145 Green #5 has been teeming with activity ever since we officially put it on the market at the end of last week. Offered at $439,000, the top-floor 1BR/1BA unit is situated in a prime Russian Hill location. Yes, the unit is a tenancy-in-common (TIC) at the moment. But the six-unit building won the right to condo convert earlier this year (after 17 years in the condo lottery). So condo conversion will most likely take place in the next few months. Continue Reading

Contact Eileen for Real Estate Help

Eileen Bermingham

Corcoran Global Living

415.823.4656

eileen@insidesfre.com

DRE# 01352627

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