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Another Jaw Dropper in Bernal

315coleridge
The San Francisco market has been somewhat off the hook in 2014, with eye-popping sales happening in full force in seemingly every neighborhood in the city. But even I’m caught off guard by some buyers’ willingness to fork over disarming amounts of money on certain properties.

Case in point: The 3BR/2BA, 1358-square foot home on 315 Coleridge. Sold in January 2012 for $850,000, the house had two bedrooms and one bath on the main level, a remodeled kitchen and a bedroom/bath on the garage level. Outdoor space consisted of a small patio area just outside the main level, with stairs going up to a deck with views.

Fast forward to March 2014, when 315 Coleridge was listed for $1,150,000. The selling price? $1,501,000. I would have liked to been at the table when that winning offer was revealed.

RSVP This Week for Home Buyer Boot Camp!

Time is running out for RSVPs—Get in shape for the Spring real estate market by attending our Home Buyer Boot Camp! Back by popular demand, Boot Camp will whip you through the ins and outs of getting financing, writing a winning offer and completing a smooth transaction. We’ll give you tons of practical, useful information you won’t find anywhere else.

Here are the deets:
Date: Saturday, April 19th
Time: 10:00-noon
Place: 1746 18th Street (betw Arkansas & Carolina in Potrero Hill)
Your Hosts: Yours truly, blogger-Realtor Eileen Bermingham of Zephyr Real Estate, and loan extraordinaire Mike Koran of Primary Residential Mortgage.

We’ll have refreshments and we won’t make you do push-ups. RSVP today to Eileen at ebermingham@zephyrsf.com, or call/text at 415.823.4656. I’ll confirm your reservation. Space fills up quickly, so please RSVP as soon as you can so we can guarantee you a seat.

What You Could’ve Bought: For Under the List Price

Buyers are paying an average of 12% over asking for houses and 10% for condos in the current San Francisco market. So I always catch a little thrill when I spot properties that sell for under the list price.

A handful of homes sold for under asking in April in popular neighborhoods. Let’s take a look at some sales that were possible without overbidding and waiving contingencies:

301 Main #20B
South Beach

List Price: $2.1M
Sale Price: $1,975,000
Days on Market (DOM): 50
Cash Sale: Yes
301Main_20B
Shed no tears for this seller, who managed to flip this unit for significantly more money. Purchased in October 2013 for $1.6M, this 2BR/2BA unit at The Infinity was listed again in February for $2.1M. That price apparently didn’t fly, but $1,975,000 did. If there’s ever a case that needs to be made for the strength of the 2014 market, #20B is a good sale to reference.

229 States
Corona Heights

List Price: $2,050,000
Sale Price: $1,925,000
DOM: 27
Cash Sale: No
229states
This ultra-modern, 2BR/2.5BA view townhouse on a great block in the neighborhood was designed by well-known architect Zack de Vito. The property was very well appointed, but a little on the small side (1545 sq feet) for buyers in the $2M range.

1806 20th Street
Potrero Hill

List Price: $1,650,000
Sale Price: $1,585,000
DOM: 38
Cash Sale: No
1806_20th
1806 20th is a two-level condo on a prime Potrero block, in the 86-unit development called Victoria Mews. Featuring three bedrooms and technically one bathroom—one bath was converted to a laundry room—the unit had stunning city views and a remodeled kitchen.

Latest SF Sales, Spotlight on SoMa

Who doesn’t love to look at sales reports hot off the presses? This edition of the Zephyr Market Tracker shows you what sold, and for how much above or below the list price.

We also look at what’s for sale in SoMa, and what Project Open Hand recently did for the community.

It’s all here in the Zephyr Market Tracker!

RSVP for Home Buyer Boot Camp!

Get in shape for the Spring real estate market by attending our Home Buyer Boot Camp! Back by popular demand, Boot Camp will whip you through the ins and outs of getting financing, writing a winning offer and completing a smooth transaction. We’ll give you tons of practical, useful information you won’t find anywhere else.

Here are the deets:
Date: Saturday, April 19th
Time: 10:00-noon
Place: 1746 18th Street (betw Arkansas & Carolina in Potrero Hill)
Your Hosts: Yours truly, blogger-Realtor Eileen Bermingham of Zephyr Real Estate, and loan extraordinaire Mike Koran of Primary Residential Mortgage.

We’ll have refreshments and we won’t make you do push-ups. RSVP today to Eileen at ebermingham@zephyrsf.com, or call/text at 415.823.4656. I’ll confirm your reservation. Space fills up quickly, so please RSVP as soon as you can so we can guarantee you a seat.

Where’s 2014 Going in SF Real Estate?

The first quarter of 2014 is history, but the sales stats and other market conditions I’m experiencing give us an idea as to where the market is heading this year.

Let’s take a look at activity for single-family homes and condos first:
Single-Family Home Market
# Sold: 442
Average Price: $1,401,901
Percentage of Cash Sales: 25%
# Homes Sold for $1M or Less: 226
Where to Buy for $1M or Less: Outer Parkside/Sunset; Parkside/Central Sunset; Merced Heights; Ingleside; Midtown Terrace; Miraloma Park; Sunnyside; Bayview; Crocker Amazon; Excelsior; Outer Mission; Visitacion Valley; Portola; Silver Terrace.
Volume Lower, Prices Higher: It was full speed ahead for the single-family home market in the first quarter. Though volume was down slightly from the first quarter of 2013 when 497 houses sold, the average price was up from $1,164,962 (Q1 2013). Of the 109 cash sales, more than half were for homes above $1M, including a $10M home on Green Street in Pacific Heights and a $7M property on Duncan in Noe Valley.

Condo Market
# Sold: 568
Average Price: $1,033,560
Percentage of Cash Sales: 24%
# Homes Sold for $1M or Less: 321
Where to Buy for $1M or Less: Ingleside Heights; Diamond Heights; 1BRs in Eureka Valley and NoPa; Western Addition; Downtown; Van Ness Corridor; Bernal Heights; Mission; Mission Bay; Potrero; SoMa; South Beach; Dogpatch.
Volume Again Lower, Prices Higher: The condo market also didn’t miss a beat where prices were concerned. A total of 546 condos sold for an average of $901,046 in Q1 2013. A year later, the average has broken $1M.

Where Are We Headed in 2014?
I’ve received at least half a dozen calls or emails from clients in the past two weeks asking whether it’s a good time to sell. The concern is that selling now may find them leaving money on the table if prices increase.

I think that if you own a home right now and are in a position to sell it, you should take advantage of this market. For one thing, interest rates are on the rise. And though 25% of buyers are running around with cash, the other 75% of the buyer pool will be sensitive to higher interest rates, and will be watching their offer prices a bit more closely. I also believe that we’re in somewhat of a peak period, and that prices have only so much further to go this year before they flatten. I didn’t feel that way in 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013. But based on market activity to date, it feels like 2014 will be different.

Another major factor that may keep resale prices even in 2014 is the expected increase in inventory. We’ll see the typical inventory bump in Spring and Fall, as well as many new construction condo projects kicking off sales on many buildings in the city pipline. This means that buyers will have more properties to choose from. And for sellers, that will translate into less offers per property and less intense overbidding.

What You Can Buy: For Up to $500,000

symphonytowers
The average condo price in San Francisco in the first quarter was just over $1M, and for houses, it was around $1.4M. So what can you buy if you can afford…half that amount or less?

I surveyed first-quarter sales to nail down specifics about what you can expect to be available in the $500,000 range. So let’s get to the point and look at each property category:

Condos
The condo category will have the most inventory in this range. Studios or one bedrooms will come up most frequently in larger buildings in neighborhoods such as Ingleside Heights, South Beach, Downtown, the Van Ness corridor and Potrero. For example, a 400-square-foot studio with parking at 750 Van Ness in Symphony Towers (pictured above) sold for $454,000 and overlooked the courtyard.

Other buildings that often have units in this range are 631 O’Farrell and 900 Bush, along with 8400 Oceanview Terrace in Ingleside Heights.

Two-bedroom condos do come up for under $500,000, but are typically located in Hunters Point or Crocker Amazon.

About a quarter of condos in this range were purchased in cash transactions in the first quarter.

Single-Family Homes
Inventory here mostly consists of houses that need work or are tenant occupied (or both) in the city’s southeastern neighborhoods such as Bayview and Visitacion Valley. Many of these are purchased in cash transactions.

TICs
It’s possible to purchase a TIC in this range that will be in a smaller, more charming type of building, in a more popular neighborhood, However, such units will be in properties with three or more units and will require fractional financing.

March Goes Out Like Lion for SF Overbidders Club

Did you hear the roar buyers paying more than 25% over the list price for San Francisco homes in March? Well, I did. The SF Overbidders Club closed out the month of March making me wonder whether or not we can really expect April overbidding to be lamblike.

Overbidding happened across all property types this month, with healthy overbid averages happening:
Houses: 10.5% Condos: 9% TICs: 4.5%

But I found a home in each category that trumped those averages. Please welcome our newest SF Overbidders Club members:

465 Hoffman
Noe Valley House

4BR/4.5BA, 2 pkg, 4500 sq ft
List Price: $3,795,000
Sale Price: $5,105,000
Overbid Amount: 34.5%
What else can you tell me? Big, SoMa-style house with epic views.
465hoffman

338 Spear #7J
South Beach Condo

1BR/1BA, 1 pkg, 1025 sq ft
List Price: $849,000
Sale Price: $1,130,000
Overbid Amount: 33%
What else can you tell me? The buyer for this one-bedroom in the Infinity Tower 2 made a pre-emptive offer that the seller accepted. Marketed as a “unique floor plan of a large 1 BR plus den with a private patio for less than $850 per square feet!”, the buyer one-upped that proposition by paying $1102/sq ft.
338spear_7

49 Dorland
Mission Dolores TIC

2BR/2BA, 1 pkg, 1032 sq ft
List Price: $699,000
Sale Price: $926,000
Overbid Amount: 32.5%
What else can you tell me? TIC with fractional loans in a three-unit building. Parking tandem. Building Ellis Acted in 2004 by previous owners.
49dorland_2

SF Real Estate Market Strong, Despite Earthquake Risks

I was interviewed for a story that ran yesterday in the British daily The Guardian about the threat of a large earthquake and how that might influence people when they consider purchasing real estate in San Francisco.

Yes, local market is particularly strong right now, and yes, I routinely have conversations with home buyers about the concept of earthquakes and how they can protect their investment. When it comes down to it, it’s important to know what ground you’re on and how solid your foundation and other seismic components are.

The Guardian’s Nate Berg did a great job presenting all angles of this topic. Check it out here:
When, Not If: How Do San Franciscans Live With the Threat of the Next Quake?

And if you’re interested in my take on earthquake insurance, this past blog post discusses that:
Should You Buy Earthquake Insurance?

What You Can Buy: View Condos

San Francisco properties with views of the hills, city skyline, ocean or Bay command a premium. The whole “million dollar view” tag line really does ring true for some homes.

And when it comes to condos in centrally located neighborhoods, views are the icing on the cake. View condos certainly fall under the “luxury” category, and they’ll typically cost above the $1M average for a two-bedroom unit.

I surveyed the market and picked out my favorite three view condos to spotlight today:

657 Corbett #3
Twin Peaks

4BR/3BA, 2101 sq ft
1-car parking
HOA dues: $316.22/mo
List price: $1,495,000
657corbett657 Corbett #3 is the penthouse condo in this four-unit building, and it certainly pulls out all the stops. The two-level residence features walls of glass with stunning views of downtown, The Bay and beyond. And it’s a corner unit, so you also get great east and south views. Three bedrooms are all on the same level, with the fourth bedroom on the main level. Though you’re not in the heart of a retail area, the reason to live on Corbett is for its views. Because let’s face it, you don’t get views in the flatlands of the Castro. Quick comp: #1 on the first floor of 657 Corbett is a 4BR/3BA unit with 2007 sq feet that’s in contract with a list price of $1,395,000.

2139 Green #F
Pacific Heights

2BR/2BA, 1460 sq ft
1-car parking
HOA dues: $526.27/mo
List price: $1,795,000
239green_f
The best part about 2139 Green #F is its 500-sq foot deck with amazing views of the Golden Gate Bridge to Alcatraz and then some. The building was constructed in 1988, so the interior is modern in design. This is another two-level unit, and the master suite, second bedroom and two baths are downstairs. The master features French doors that lead to a colorful garden and patio. An elevator in this nine-unit building takes you right to your front door, too. Quick comp: The slightly larger 2BR/2.5BA unit at #E sold a year ago in a cash transaction for $1,750,000. That also had a large deck, striking views and a similar floor plan.

219 Brannan #18A
South Beach

3BR/2BA, 1611 sq ft
2-car parking
HOA dues: $1013/mo
List price: $2,500,000
219brannan_18a
Perched on the top floor of 219 Brannan, the penthouse at #18A has soaring ceilings, floor-to-ceiling glass windows and views spanning Twin Peaks to the downtown skyline and the Bay Bridge. There’s a bedroom terrace that lets you really connect to that big view, as well as a chef’s kitchen and rare two-car parking. HOA dues include attended lobby, fitness center, concierge, pool, and security service. Quick comp: The 2BR/2BA at #16D with northeast views of the skyline and Bay sold last month for $2.1M in a cash transaction. #18A itself was sold in 2007 for $2,150,000, and then again in 2010 for $1,650,000.

Spotlight on Mission Dolores Park, SF Conserves Water

The latest Zephyr MarketTracker gives you the scoop on Mission Dolores Park’s renovations, and also takes a look at a couple properties on the market in this very popular neighborhood.

We also congratulate San Franciscans for leading the way where water conservation is concerned!

You’ll also see recent sales and a market overview. It’s all here in the current edition of the Zephyr MarketTracker!

Onyx in Potrero Knows Its Target Buyers

onyx_livingroom
I guess it was only a matter of time before someone decided to build a condo development with the look and feel of an Apple store. Sharing its name with an OS X utility app and saturated in white, Onyx in Potrero Hill certainly knows its buyer demographic.

I visited Onyx this week on my broker tour, and I do like the finishes and the location within the neighborhood. Onyx will ultimately house 41 one-, two- and three-bedroom condos across three stories and two buildings. (The second building will rise at the corner of 17th and Carolina, and will be completed in Fall 2015.) The two-story lobby has white porcelain flooring and “signature, ONYX stone.” You may stop momentarily to look for the Genius Bar, but the best bet is to either head up the stairs or take the elevator to the second floor to check out the available units.

One of my favorites was #206, which faces 17th Street and has city skyline views from the living area and bedroom. That’s a 2BR/2.5BA unit with about 1237 square feet listed for $1,325,000. (Knock $40,000 off the price if you don’t want the parking.) HOA dues range from $383-$443/month.

Finishes include wide plank European oak floors with radiant heat, as well as built-in Liebherr refrigerators, Bosch dishwashers, Bertazzoni professional series gas cooktops, quartz countertops and high-gloss white cabinets by Barbosa:
onyx_kitchen

Bathrooms are large and have similar finishes:
onyx_bathroom2

onyx_bathroom

Other perks in Onyx include bike parking, storage lockers, a rooftop terrace with downtown and Bay views and elevator access to all levels. And oh, yeah–we can’t forget the CAT6 internal wiring, security system, and high speed internet access by Webpass.

Pricing for the first release of ten units ranges from $875,000-$1,325,000 with parking, and are averaging between $1,000-$1100/sq foot. Offers on these first ten units will be considered on March 25th.

As I mentioned earlier, the second building in the complex will be finished next year. That one will have outlooks onto Jackson Field and views toward Mission Bay. It will also knock out what outlooks exist to the north for a few of the units in the existing building, with an approximate distance of 20 feet between structures.

I like Onyx’s location, as It’s on a quieter street, but is only a block from Whole Foods, World Gym and is near many restaurants and services. You’re limited to bus lines around the immediate area, but Google shuttles stop nearby. Downtown commuters can hoof it a dozen or so blocks to the T line on Third Street in Dogpatch.

And if you’re seriously interested and would like your own agent representation, please give me a shout at 415.823.4656 / ebermingham@zephyrsf.com.

What Do Home Inspections Cover?

garage
Buying a home is a big deal, and you want to make sure there are no surprises with any of the systems once you own the property. There are typically two types of standard inspections done in San Francisco. One is a general contractor, and the other is a structural termite.

The general contractor inspection should be conducted by a certified professional from a reputable company that works in San Francisco on a regular basis. The inspector will go through the fundamental components of the property, which include a look at the electrical, plumbing and heating systems. The inspection will extend to the overall condition of the foundation and structural support, which extends to crawl and attic spaces. The roof will also be evaluated. What the inspector is looking for are any deficiencies, and he or she then can make recommendations for repair, or defer a particular item to a more specialized professional. For example, if there are any signs of issues with the sewer line, the inspector may recommend having a sewer lateral inspection done.

A termite inspection covers the condition of the wood throughout the building, as well as structural support. You’ll get the scoop on whether there’s earth-to-wood contact, termite damage, or dry rot. The written report will typically include estimates for all “Section 1″ items, which are recommended repairs. It’s ideal to have a termite inspection for review in a disclosure package so buyers have an idea as to how much they may have to spend to do repairs in the future. Keep in mind that if you’d like to have the wood underneath stucco inspected (ideal), you’ll need to let the seller know that so they can give permission to the inspector to drill test holes. (They patch the test holes.)

Other inspections you can have done are related to fireplaces (particularly if they haven’t been used in a while), the aforementioned sewer lateral, and foundation (if you’re interested in a structural engineer’s opinion). If the general contractor flags electrical or plumbing issues, you may want to have a licensed electrician or plumber do a walkthrough and provide an estimate on resolving those issues.

Some inspectors will turn on washer/dryers and other appliances to make sure they’re operating properly. It’s also a good idea to turn on the heat (or air conditioning, if that’s available), and a gas fireplace. If you’re not in a position to have appliances checked, including a home warranty in your purchase is an excellent idea. The warranty covers repairs for the first year of your ownership and is about $400.

Here are some of my go-to inspectors:
General Home:
GCIS
Arch Home Inspection
H.R. Wellington

Termite:
Fox Structural & Termite
Lingruen & Associates
H.R. Wellington
Markoff

Microhoods Key to Bernal’s Home Values

bernalheights
Bernal Heights has many distinct areas within its neighborhood. From the hip enclave of Precita Park to the winding streets on the East Slope, the price of real estate literally varies depending upon which part of Bernal you’re in. So it’s important to lean heavily on sales in your particular part of the neighborhood when you’re accurately trying to determine property values in Bernal.

To help buyers and sellers with that task, I’ve deconstructed Bernal Heights into seven unofficial microhoods, complete with their respective price averages and low/high prices, as well as recent sales volume.

A few ground rules: My geographical boundaries are rough approximations, and there will be some overlap with streets that fall on microhood borders. Also, sales information is for single-family homes sold from September 2013-March 10, 2014.

North West Slope
Average Price: $1,195,589
Low: $699,000 High: $1,688,888
Number Sold: 10
northwestslope
The North West Slope has quaint tree-lined streets, hidden staircases and lots of charm. It’s near Mission Street’s bus lines and not far from the 24th & Mission BART station/30th & Church J Muni, as well as The Front Porch, Emmy’s Spaghetti Shack, Cole Hardware and Safeway. Five homes on the North West Slope sold above $1.3M over the past seven months, including a 2BR/2BA at the top of Bocana listed for $1,095,000 that sold for $1,610,000.

North of Cortland
Avge Price: $1,260,818
Low: $910,000 High: $1.6M
Number Sold: 11
northofcortland
This area just north of popular Cortland Avenue is generally its most expensive. Because who doesn’t want to be in walking distance of restaurants, cafes, shops, a grocery store, and library? North of Cortland’s narrow streets are dotted with architecturally appealing homes and have a village-like feel. There’s also easy access to Bernal Hill’s trails. Notable sales include the renovated Victorian at 228 Ellsworth for $1.6M, and the contemporary home at 77 Anderson, which had a down-to-the-studs renovation and sold for $1,499,000 in an all-cash transaction.

Precita Park
Avge Price: $1,206,125
Low: $934,000 High: $1,605,000
Number Sold: 8
precitapark
The Precita Park microhood has really blossomed over the past several years, and the high real estate prices here reflect that. From Precita Park Cafe and Hillside Supper Club to Harvest Hills Market and Precita Bark dog wash/shop, there’s a nice selection of retail businesses for locals to enjoy. And the park itself is a great place to relax and unwind, particularly for kids and dog owners. Prices for houses ranged from $934,000 for a modern cottage on Shotwell to $1,605,000 for a 4BR home just up the hill on Folsom.

East Slope
Avge Price: $1,097,467
Low: $700,000 High: $1,575,000
Number Sold: 15
eastslope
There was a time when Bernal’s more remote East Slope was home to dirt trails and vacant lots. As the area developed alongside Highway 101, streets were paved and staircases built to help people get around on the hilly, sometimes twisty streets. (In fact, a couple streets are only accessible by stairs.) Prices for homes on the East Slope aren’t stratospheric; the roughly $1.1M average was influenced by three sales for $1.4M+, including the 4BR contemporary view home at 365 Franconia that sold for $1,575,000. East Slope dwellers appreciate their low-key microhood, and even have their own architectural design review board to maintain the character of the area.

South East Slope
Avge Price: $937,500
Low: $750,000 High: $1,375,000
Number Sold: 6
southeastslope
The South East Slope is bordered by 101/Bayshore Boulevard and Alemany/280, and isn’t wildly convenient to the retail portion of Cortland. But the houses offer good space in a neighborhood where it’s a challenge to land a single-family house for less than $1M. For example, a really cool, 3BR/2BA mid-century modern home with east bay and southern views sold for $789,000 at 463 Nevada. And the best part? The Alemany Farmer’s Market is at your doorstep!

South of Cortland
Avge Price: $918,000
Low: $660,000 High: $1.5M
Number Sold: 9
southofcortland
Similar to its North of Cortland counterpart, the South of Cortland microhood is in proximity to the heart of Cortland Avenue. And you can actually find homes in the $700,000-$900,000 range. (Though the recent $1.5M cash sale half a block off Cortland at 330 Banks is the most expensive home ever sold in this microhood.)

Holly Park/St. Mary’s Park
Avge Price: $1,000,556
Low: $750,000 High: $1,255,000
Number Sold: 4
hollypark_st.mary's_south
Situated between Cortland and the Excelsior, Holly Park/St. Mary’s Park probably has the highest population of homeowners whose properties have been in their family for years. The homes in St. Mary’s are laid out on streets shaped like a bell, and St. Mary’s Park itself also has a popular, fenced-in dog area. Just to the north is Holly Park, which was renovated about ten years ago and is very popular with locals. It’s also only a few blocks from Cortland’s Avedano Holly Park Market, as well as the heart of the retail area. And nearby Mission Street gives you access to bus lines. Single-family home prices are solidly in the $900,000s, with the high-end topping out at around $1,255,000.

What You Can Buy in March: 21 Days & Counting

The San Francisco market is low on inventory right now. That means you have to dig a little deeper to find buying opportunities, especially for properties in desirable locations. One of my strategies is to take a closer look at homes that have been on the market for three or more weeks. The possibility of multiple offers is lower, and sellers may be thinking about taking a little less on their list price.

Here are three properties that I think are well worth considering at the moment:
555 Bartlett #321
The Mission

Days on market (DOM): 48
1BR/1BA, 1 pkg
List Price: $629,000
555bartlett_321
I’m a big fan of 555 Bartlett, as I sold a unit there in 2010 when the building was constructed. Unit 321 has upgraded cabinetry and quartz countertops in the kitchen and plenty of natural light. This particular unit is on the third floor and overlooks the landscaped courtyard (that has a bbq area). Very convenient location near BART, Valencia/Mission restaurants and easy freeway access. One huge plus is the newly landscaped Cesar Chavez, which has really transformed the look and feel of the street. HOA dues are $375/month in this 58-unit building, and parking/storage are included. #321 last sold in 2010 for $452,500.

920 Monterey
Westwood Highlands

DOM: 28
4BR/2BA, 1 pkg
List Price: $1,695,000
920monterey_kitchen
920 Monterey is an excellent option for buyers looking for a spacious Spanish Mediterranean home that’s been remodeled and is ready to go. First off, there’s the kitchen (above). It’s well appointed and has an island! There are also three bedrooms on the same level, as well as a master suite downstairs with a sitting area. Shoot down Monterey and you can jump on 280 or the Glen Park BART station. 920 Monterey was last sold for $1,775,000 in 2006.

1488 Harrison #102
SoMa

DOM: 44
1BR/2BA, 1 pkg
List Price: $649,000
1488harrison_102
One of the best-priced lofts I’ve seen in a while, 1488 Harrison #102 is also very well maintained. In terms of outlooks, you’re facing Costco across the street. Though that’s not glamorous, it’s better than facing a brick wall and you’ll never be at a loss for toilet paper, wine or random electronics. There is a washer/dryer and full bath (full bath!) on the main level, and another full bath upstairs in the sleeping area. HOA dues are $419/month, and there’s an elevator in the building. From this location, you can walk to various SoMa and Mission restaurants and bars (Bar Agricole is around the corner). You’re four blocks from the Market and South Van Ness Muni Station, and you have very easy access to 101. #321 last sold for $350,000 in 2011.